Posts Tagged ‘Antique Appraisal Santa Barbara’

How Much Are Your Old Antiques Worth?

How-much-are-your-old-antiques worth

There are a number of resources and online tools available today that can help you find out the value of almost any item. Here are some tips to help you proceed.

Get an Appraisal
While many people use local antique shops or collectable dealers to find out the value of old and/or unique items, it’s usually best to use a certified appraiser who’s accredited and meets professional and ethical standards. Certified appraisers are more likely to give you a fair judgment because there’s no conflict of interest. It’s actually a violation of professional ethics for an appraiser to offer to buy an item he or she has appraised.

A professional appraiser will provide you a written report that includes a full description of your item and the procedure used to estimate its current value. For their service, you can expect to pay either a flat fee or an hourly rate from $200 to $400 depending on their expertise and location. Avoid an appraiser who asks for a fee based on a percentage of the item’s value.

If an appraiser thinks an object isn’t worth a written appraisal, he or she might recommend other resources to arrive at a value.

To locate an appraiser either by location or specialty, search online at one of the three professional appraising organizations: The American Society of Appraisers, which has around 5,000 members worldwide; Appraisers Association of America that has around 700 members; and the International Society of Appraisers that has about 900 members.

Online Resources
You can also get estimates by professional appraisers and other experts through a number of websites. How it works is you upload photos of your items and provide descriptions, and the sites send back valuations usually within a week.

Sites that provide this type of service include Value My Stuff, which charges $10 for one appraisal, $25 for three or $75 for 10. And WorthPoint, which charges $30 for one item or $75 for three, or you can pay $20 for a monthly membership that provides unlimited access to their antique and collectables valuations.

Another resource for finding out what antiques and collectables are worth is Kovels, which offers a free basic membership that gives you access to its online price guide, or you can purchase one of their premium services that run $39 or $60 a year. They also sell the “Kovels’ Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide 2014″ for $28 that reports on recent prices paid for 35,000 items in more than 700 categories at auctions, shops, shows, flea markets, and online.

You may also be able to get an idea of what others are willing to pay for your stuff by searching similar items on the massive online auction site ebay.com, or the classified ads site craigslist.org. Both of these sites are free to search.

Tax-Deductible Value If you are interested in donating any of your items, you can find out the tax-deductible value at free valuation sites available year-round by tax-prep companies like Turbo Tax, or The Salvation Army.

Original article posted on Huffington Post

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10 Tips on Caring for Antique Furniture

malachite

Caring for antique furniture is a little different from caring for your regular, more recently made furniture. It has survived many years, and it has a history. That history is not just related to who made it, and when, but also encompasses such factors as who used it and where. The history of usage also affects the condition of a piece, and by now owning that piece, you become a link in that chain. The piece that you own might have been handed down through generations in your family, or maybe you lovingly purchased it. As you look for ways to care for it, know this: applying new finishes or changing how it looks can impact its value, and storing or using it carelessly can impact how long it lasts. Take a look at some tips to help you care for your antique furniture:
  • Avoid placing in direct sunlight. While UV or ultraviolet light can damage any furniture, antique furniture is more prone to it. Sunlight can damage the wood and fabrics, and turn clear finishes to yellow or opaque. Curtains or shades may help in a room that gets too much sun.
  • Avoid placing your antique furniture in front of heating and air conditioning vents. Keep it away from other heat sources such as radiators, fireplaces or stoves to prevent shrinking that can result in loose glued joints, veneers, inlays and marquetry.
  • Avoid too much change in the level of humidity because changes in relative humidity can cause wood to expand and contract. Not only does this affect joints as much as temperature changes, changes in the moisture level can also lead to mold growth and even insect infestation. Use a humidifier or dehumidifier to minimize damage.
  • Avoid storing in hot, dry areas such as an attic. The lack of moisture can damage your antique furniture.
  • Check for insect infestations which can be identified by small holes and fine sawdust under the piece of furniture. Isolate that piece and get professional help to prevent further damage and the risk of infesting other pieces.
  • Dust with a soft, lint free cloth on a regular basis. Use a slightly dampened cloth turning it frequently to prevent scratches. If your furniture has a finish that is deteriorating, consult a professional. Any cleaning or waxing can be detrimental.
  • Avoid using furniture oils or silicone based polishes since that can lead to the deterioration of the finish over time and residue from the oil may attract dust and dirt build up. If your finish is in good condition use a coat of high quality paste wax to maintain a varnished surface and provide protection from moisture and dust. A thin coat once a year or so should be sufficient.
  • Avoid stripping or removing the finish the finish on your antique furniture is as important as the furniture itself. By removing the original finish, you damage the patina and the any signs of wear which indicate a piece’s history. Once that is removed, it is gone for ever taking away from the historicity of your piece.
  • If you need to enhance the appearance of antique furniture or restore the existing finish, it is best to consult a professional restorer. This is not a job for an amateur, as you may end up doing more harm than good. On the other hand proper restoration can actually increase the value of your antique, while enhancing its appearance.
Original article posted on About.com

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How to Care for Antiques and Collectibles

As an antique appraisers we get asked many questions about caring for antiques and collectibles. The proper care is essential to maintain the value of your antiques and collectibles. Once your antiques and collectibles have any condition issues the value declines. In this article we have provided some tips on how to care for popular antiques and collectibles.

Antique and Collectible Furniture:

  • Dust antique furniture frequently. Use a soft cloth to dust and polish antique furniture.
  • Polish antique furniture only once or twice a year. Use a good beeswax based polish.  Apply the polish, leave overnight and then buff.
  • Do not use a spray polish. These polishes contain silicon, which builds up a sticky surface. This will deplete the natural oils in the wood.
  • Keep the temperature and humidity regulated. Too much or too little humidity can damage wood and veneer. Temperature changes especially from one extreme to another will damage wood.  This will occur mainly when transporting antique furniture and other wood pieces from one climate to another.
  • Monitor the amount of sunlight that reaches the furniture. Sunlight has many damaging effects on antique furniture. Here is a short list:
    • Fades the finish and any fabrics
    • Dries out the wood and other materials
    • Deteriorates the integrity of fabrics and other materials
    • Where possible, turn pieces of furniture around occasionally, to even the fading process
  • Keep curtains drawn on sunny days when rooms are not in use.
  • Inspect furnitures periodically for lifting veneer or molding. This will sound hollow if lightly tapped. Also look for loose joints, water damage or woodworm holes.
  • If required to repair damage to antique furniture choose a reputable restoration shop. Good restoration takes time and money – a careless repair won’t last and can hurt the value more than if the piece was not repaired.

Antique Clocks:

  • Keep antique clocks running.
  • Wind carefully, using the correct size key.
  • Be careful when winding antique clocks, spring-driven bracket and mantle clocks need to be held steady when winding. When winding a weight-driven regulator, longcase or grandfather clocks open the door to enable you to see that the weights do not hit the case or pendulum.
  • Do not use Windex or any other ammonia based glass cleaner on the clock face, dial, gilding, painted or gilded glass.

Antique and Collectible Porcelain and Pottery:

  • Hold the item by the main part of the body. Never hold or lift an item by the handle. The handle of an item is the weakest point. Many time there is damage to a handle that can not be seen, holding or lifting the item by the handle can cause further damage or may destroy the item altogether.
  • Do not use abrasive or harsh cleaners.
  • If the porcelain or Pottery item is very dirty, use a soft sponge to gently wipe clean.
  • Do not use any kind of tape on lids or main body of the piece – peeling it off may remove enamel or gilding.
  • Keep antique porcelain and pottery pieces behind glass.

Antique Silver:

  • Wash silver in hot soapy water. Make sure to rinse the silver piece in hot water, dry thoroughly and buff with a soft cloth.
  • Remove tarnish with one of the many commercial products available in the market. Silver polishes are abrasive. Use these polishes to a minimum, they can damage the silver if over used.
  • To preserve the polish on domestic silver. Wrap the silver piece in dry, acid-free tissue paper and store the silver piece in a plastic bag.

Antique and Collectible Jewelry:

  • Apply hairspray and perfume before putting on your jewelry. Allow these substances to dry. Spray and other substances  can stain gold or silver and damage pearls.
  • Do not use jewelry cleaners, these chemical cleaners can damage antique jewelry. Soap, water and toothbrush will clean most antique jewelry. A little toothpaste and a toothbrush is a great way to clean diamonds.
Remember to test any methods of cleaning on an unseen area first. Every antique is different if you have any concerns consult a specialist before cleaning or repairing your antiques. The methods above may not be suitable for all antiques. Original article posted on Antique HQ

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3 Useful Antique Store Finds

When you think of an antique store do you picture a store filled with dusty shelves of broken, old things that remind you that you are glad we have modern conveniences? Or do you picture a store full of useful treasures that are just waiting to be dug out? Many things produced many years ago were of much better quality that you have find today. Here are a few treasures that you can find to start your collection: Antique-Linens

1. Linens and Clothing

This one might be a surprise because generally we think of antique clothing as something thread bare and not worth much. You can often find some modest, yet stylish skirts and dresses. Linens are another great buy at antique stores in Santa Barbara. If you are looking for some you can find beautifully hand sewn linens that were probably used only once or twice and very carefully preserved by the keeper of the home. These can make for very pretty and unique table decor.   Antique-Bowls

2. Kitchen Dishware

Antique dishes can tend to be somewhat thinner than what is on the market today but some larger dishware like pryex and crock style bowls can be mroe durable than their modern day counterparts. Nothing beats an excellent stoneware bowl that will probably last through your lifetime for only $15! You can also look for heirloom glassware to collect like Fostoria Crystal.   Antique-Games

3. Random Things!

Sometimes you can find old games that are fun additions to your overall game collection. Other things you can find include tools to use outside that you just can’t buy anymore, great old canning supplies like jars and strainers, and even fabric to sew with. You just never know what you might come across that can be useful in your daily life! You can almost always find something you can use for less than what you could buy the modern counterpart for at the store. Not to mention it’s a fun experience looking through all the treasures of days gone by! Original article posted on Little House Living

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5 Budget Friendly Antiques Under $10

Start scouring flea markets, online auctions, and yard sales for these wallet-friendly scores—from miniature busts to rubber stamps.
Mass-produced by a handful of outfits during the 1950s, '60s, and '70s, these diminutive statuettes served as popular gifts from piano teacher to student. Herco Industries, the accessories division of Hershman Brothers Musical Instrument Company, cast the four-inch-tall chalkware maestros below (from left, Paderewski, Mozart, and Mendelssohn). We snagged the trio for $9.

1. Composer Busts

Mass-produced by a handful of outfits during the 1950s, ’60s, and ’70s, these diminutive statuettes served as popular gifts from piano teacher to student. Herco Industries, the accessories division of Hershman Brothers Musical Instrument Company, cast the four-inch-tall chalkware maestros below (from left, Paderewski, Mozart, and Mendelssohn). We snagged the trio for $9.    
The combo bottle-and-can opener debuted shortly after Prohibition—when brewers first started marketing canned beer—and remained prevalent until the pull tab's release in 1962. Often given away with the purchase of a six-pack, the simple tools are in plentiful supply today. Snap them up for as little as $1 each.

2. Bottle Openers

The combo bottle-and-can opener debuted shortly after Prohibition—when brewers first started marketing canned beer—and remained prevalent until the pull tab’s release in 1962. Often given away with the purchase of a six-pack, the simple tools are in plentiful supply today. Snap them up for as little as $1 each.
Beginning in the early 20th century, tailors, haberdasheries, dry cleaners, and even banks imprinted their logos, slogans, and other information on these wooden freebies—a publicity tactic that endured through the 1970s. The examples here, all under $5 a pop, hail from between the 1930s and the 1960s.

3. Advertising Hangers

Beginning in the early 20th century, tailors, haberdasheries, dry cleaners, and even banks imprinted their logos, slogans, and other information on these wooden freebies—a publicity tactic that endured through the 1970s. The examples here, all under $5 a pop, hail from between the 1930s and the 1960s.  
To create this two-headed horse, the developer flipped the negative and exposed the print a second time; but there's no telling if that move was intentional or merely a darkroom mistake. We unearthed these circa-1915 prints in a box of discarded proofs, priced at under a buck each—evidence that it's worth digging for special effects or gaffes (double exposures, light leaks, awkward cropping) that add extra interest to otherwise ordinary works.

4. Photographers’ Proofs

To create this two-headed horse, the developer flipped the negative and exposed the print a second time; but there’s no telling if that move was intentional or merely a darkroom mistake. We unearthed these circa-1915 prints in a box of discarded proofs, priced at under a buck each—evidence that it’s worth digging for special effects or gaffes (double exposures, light leaks, awkward cropping) that add extra interest to otherwise ordinary works.  
The first rubber stamp was introduced in the late 1860s. Businesses adopted the efficient labels over the next few decades, and the technology remained predominant for more than a century. The post-1930 devices at right recorded dates, payments, approvals, employee attendance on time sheets, and quality-control inspections. (Check out the workers' names—Topsy! Shirley! Dessie!) Now the throwbacks can be sourced for as little as $3 per stamp.

5. Rubber Stamps

The first rubber stamp was introduced in the late 1860s. Businesses adopted the efficient labels over the next few decades, and the technology remained predominant for more than a century. The post-1930 devices at right recorded dates, payments, approvals, employee attendance on time sheets, and quality-control inspections. (Check out the workers’ names—Topsy! Shirley! Dessie!) Now the throwbacks can be sourced for as little as $3 per stamp.   Original article posted on Country Living

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